Library

Dogs + Medications

  • Acepromazine is a sedative/tranquilizer used primarily in cats and dogs as a pre-medication for anesthesia or for chemical restraint. It is given by injection in the clinic or by mouth in the form of a tablet. The most common side effect is low blood pressure. Acepromazine should not be used in conjunction with certain toxicities, or in pets with heart disease, low blood pressure. It should be used cautiously in pets with mild liver or heart disease, clotting problems, or in pregnant, debilitated, or young animals. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • Acetazolamide is a diuretic used off label and given by mouth to treat glaucoma or alkalosis. The most common side effect is stomach upset, but other side effects of the central nervous system, blood, kidneys, electrolytes, blood sugar levels, liver, or skin are possible. Do not use this medication in pets with liver or kidney disease, or low sodium or potassium blood levels. Use with caution in pets with acidosis, diabetes, pregnancy or lactation. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Acetylcysteine is given by mouth, injection, or topically and is used on and off label to treat toxicities or to break up mucus. It is usually a prescription, but some forms may be found over the counter. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effect is an upset stomach. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Afoxolaner is a chewable tablet used to treat and prevent flea and tick infestations in dogs. It has also been used off-label to treat certain types of mange and mites. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset or neurologic symptoms. Do not use in pets with a history of seizures. If a negative reaction occurs, please call the veterinary office.

  • Albuterol sulfate is a bronchodilator, used off label, to treat asthma and cough related to bronchoconstriction. It is administered as an inhalant in cats and by mouth, as a tablet, in dogs. The most common side effects include nervousness, shaking, fast heartbeat, and dizziness. Use with caution in pets with diabetes, hyperthyroidism, high blood pressure, seizures, heart disease, abnormal heart rhythms, or pregnancy. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • Allopurinol is an oral medication typically used to prevent uric acid and calcium oxalate stones in dogs. It is also used off-label to treat leishmaniasis and gout in dogs and other species. Side effects are uncommon but may involve stomach upset. Caution must be taken when allopurinol is used in conjunction with certain other medications. It should not be used in pets with liver or kidney dysfunction or in red-tailed hawks.

  • Alprazolam is a medication given by mouth as a tablet or liquid used off label in cats and dogs to treat anxiety and phobias. Common side effects include sedation, increased appetite, or uncoordinated walking. This medication should not be used in pets with a paradoxical reaction and should be used with caution in debilitated, geriatric, pregnant, lactating pets, or in pets with liver or kidney disease, or glaucoma. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Aluminum hydroxide is commonly used off label to treat high phosphate levels in pets with kidney disease. It is given by mouth, with meals, in the form of a liquid gel, powder, or a compounded capsule. The most common side effect is constipation, and therefore should be used in caution with pets with a gastrointestinal obstruction or pets prone to constipation. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Amantadine is an antiviral medication given by mouth in the form of a tablet, capsule, or liquid, that is mainly used off label for its pain control effects in pets. Common side effects include agitation and gastrointestinal effects. It should not be used in pets that are allergic to it, or that have untreated glaucoma. It should be used with caution in pets with liver, kidney, or heart disease, or in pets with eczema or seizures. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Aminocaproic acid is a medication that blocks the breakdown of blood clots, and is used to treat postoperative bleeding, especially in sighthounds. It is given by mouth in the form of a tablet or liquid, or it can be given by injection by your veterinarian in the hospital. Side effects are uncommon but can include vomiting, diarrhea, or decreased appetite when they do occur. Do not use this medication in pets that are currently experiencing clotting in the vessels, and use with caution in pets with heart, liver, or kidney disease. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

Contact Us

Phone: 802-888-7776

Text: 802-888-7776

Email: [email protected]

Fax: 802-888-4325

————————————–

147 Stancliff rd

Morrisville, VT 05661

Hours of Operations
Monday8:00am – 5:00pm
Tuesday8:00am – 5:00pm
Wednesday8:00am – 5:00pm
Thursday8:00am – 5:00pm
Friday8:00am – 5:00pm
Saturday8:00am – 12:00pm
SundayClosed

Closed Sundays and major holidays, at which times we are still available for emergencies.

Emergencies

We are available for emergencies 24/7 for existing clients. If your pet is having an emergency please call 802-888-7776. You will be prompted on how to reach a doctor.